Форум Альдебаран
Добро пожаловать, Гость. Пожалуйста, войдите или зарегистрируйтесь.
08 Апреля 2020, 06:06:48

Войти
Перейти в Библиотеку «Альдебаран»
Наш форум в версии для PDA (КПК)
Наш форум в версии для WAP

Наш форум переехал на новый сервер. Идет настройка работы сайта.
1189616 Сообщений в 4361 Тем от 9549 Пользователей
Последний пользователь: Nora.05
* Начало Помощь Календарь Войти Регистрация
Форум Альдебаран  |  Литература  |  Специальная литература и Обучение  |  Наша Academia (Модератор: Лiнкс)  |  Тема: Ask those who know... 0 Пользователей и 1 Гость смотрят эту тему. « предыдущая тема следующая тема »
Страниц: [1] Вниз Печать
Автор Тема: Ask those who know...  (Прочитано 4223 раз)
Лiнкс
Administrator
Архимаг
*****
Оффлайн Оффлайн

Пол: Женский
Сообщений: 84115


КОФЕ - ОН!


WWW E-mail
« : 19 Мая 2010, 12:57:14 »

 There is a widely held belief that most Germans are industrious, Italians passionate and British phlegmatic and reserved. Leaving Italians and Germans alone :) I suggest we do  our little research on what British and Americans are like. Let's  share popular stereotypes about these nations and "ask those who know" to find out if there is  little truth in these views. :)

I'll start with a small chapter from George Mikes' " How to be an alien"

THE NATIONAL PASSION
    Queueing  is the national passion of an  otherwise  dispassionate race.
The English are rather shy about it, and deny that they adore it.
    On  the  Continent, if people  are  waiting at a bus-stop  they  loiter
around in a  seemingly vague fashion. When the bus arrives they  make a dash
for  it; most of them leave by the bus and a lucky minority is taken away by
an elegant black ambulance car. An Englishman, even if he is alone, forms an
orderly queue of one.
    (...)    At week-ends an Englishman queues  up  at the bus-stop, travels out  to
Richmond, queues up for  a  boat, then queues up for tea, then queues up for
ice cream, then joins a few  more odd queues just for the sake of the fun of
it, then queues up at the bus-stop and has the time of his life.


My question  to those who know: Is it true that  queueing  is the British national passion? :)
« Последнее редактирование: 19 Мая 2010, 15:54:35 от LYNX » Записан

«... І у вi снах, навік застиглих у моїх очах » Віктуар
lantan
Библиоман
*******
Оффлайн Оффлайн

Сообщений: 2410


редкозем с глазами цвета хмурого неба


WWW E-mail
« Ответ #1 : 19 Мая 2010, 14:39:19 »



My question  to those who know: Is it true that  queueing  is the British national passion? :)
Well, if they really DO have a passion for queueing then that's a very strange passion, because most of Brits hate doing it... Standing in line is a time-wasting, when they've got to be at work, on a date, appointment, or just home....
Записан

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I can not change, courage - to change the things I can, and wisdom - to see the difference.
Лiнкс
Administrator
Архимаг
*****
Оффлайн Оффлайн

Пол: Женский
Сообщений: 84115


КОФЕ - ОН!


WWW E-mail
« Ответ #2 : 19 Мая 2010, 15:10:13 »

Well, if they really DO have a passion for queueing then that's a very strange passion, because most of Brits hate doing it... Standing in line is a time-wasting, when they've got to be at work, on a date, appointment, or just home....
Thank you  :thank:. Now that one stereotype has been dismissed, here comes another.
The same author, the same fun :):

HOW TO PLAN A TOWN

     Britain, far from being a 'decadent democracy',  is a Spartan  country. This is  mainly  due to  the British way of building towns, which  dispenses  with  the reasonable  comfort  enjoyed by  all the other weak and effeminate peoples of the world.
     Medieval warriors  wore  steel breast-plates  and leggings not only for defence,  but  also to keep  up  their fighting spirit; priests of the Middle Ages tortured their bodies with hair-shirts; Indian  yogis take their  daily nap  lying on a carpet of nails to remain fit. The English plan their  towns in such a  way  that  these replace  the discomfort of  steel breast-plates, hair-shirts and nail-carpets.
     On the  Continent  doctors, lawyers, booksellers -just to mention a few examples - are sprinkled all over  the city, so you can call on a good or at least  expensive doctor in any district. In England the  idea is that  it is the  address that makes the  man. Doctors in  London are  crowded in  Harley Street, solicitors in Lincoln's Inn Fields, second-hand-bookshops in Charing
Cross Road,  newspaper  offices in Fleet  Street, tailors  in  Saville  Row, car-merchants  in Great Portland Street,  theatres around Piccadilly Circus, cinemas in  Leicester Square, etc.  (...)
     Now I should like to give you a little practical advice on how to build an English town.
     You must understand  that  an English  town  is a  vast  conspiracy  to mislead foreigners. You have to use century-old little practices and tricks.
     1.  First  of  all, never build a street  straight.  The  English  love privacy  and do not want to see  one end of  the  street from the other end. Make sudden curves  in the  streets and build them S-shaped too; the letters L,  T, V,  Y, W and 0 are also becoming increasingly popular.  It would be a fine tribute to the Greeks to build a few П¤ and Н -shaped streets; it would be an ingenious compliment to the Russians to favour the shape Я,  and I am sure  the Chinese would be  more than flattered  to see some  指-shaped thoroughfares.
     2.  Never build  the houses of  the same street in a straight line. The British have always been a freedom-loving  race  and the 'freedom to build a muddle' is one of their most ancient civic rights.
     3. Now there are further camouflage  possibilities in  the numbering of houses.  Primitive  continental races put  even  numbers  on one  side,  odd numbers on the other, and you always know  that small numbers start from the north or  west. In England  you have this  system,  too;  but you may  start numbering your  houses  at one  end, go  up to a certain  number on the same
side, then continue on the other side, going back in the opposite direction.
     You  may leave out some  numbers if you are superstitious;  and you may continue the numbering in a side  street;  you may also give the same number to two or three houses. But  this  is far from the end.  Many  people refuse  to  have  numbers altogether,  and  they  choose names. It is  very pleasant, for instance, to find  a  street with three  hundred and  fifty totally similar bungalows and look for 'The Bungalow'. Or to arrive in a street  where all the houses have a charming view of a hill and try to find  'Hill View'. Or search for 'Seven Oaks' and find a house with three apple-trees.
     4. Give a different  name to the  street whenever it bends; but if  the curve  is so sharp  that it really makes two different streets,  you may keep  the same name.  On the other hand, if, owing  to neglect, a street has been built in a  straight line  it must be  called by many  different  names (High  Holborn, New  Oxford Street, Oxford Street,  Bayswater  Road, Netting Hill Gate, Holland Park and so on).
     5. As some cute foreigners would be able  to learn their way about even under  such  circumstances, some  further  precautions  are necessary.  Call streets by various names: street, road, place, mews, crescent, avenue, rise, lane,  way,  grove,  park,  gardens,  alley,  arch,  path,  walk,  broadway, promenade, gate, terrace, vale, view, hill, etc.*
     * While  this book  was at the printers a correspondence  in  The Times showed that the English  have almost sixty synonyms for 'street.' If you add to these  the street names which stand alone (Piccadilly, Strand,  etc.) and the accepted  and frequently  used  double  names ('Garden Terrace', 'Church Street', 'Park Road', etc.) the number of street names reaches or  exceeds a
hundred. It has been suggested by one correspondent that this clearly proves what  wonderful  imagination the  English  have.  I  believe  it  proves the contrary. A West  End street in London is not called 'Haymarket' because the playful fancy  of Londoners  populates  the district  with romantically clad medieval food dealers,  but simply because they have not noticed as yet that the hay trade has considerably declined  between Piccadilly and Pall Mall in the last three hundred years.
     Now two further possibilities arise:
     (a) Gather all sorts of  streets  and  squares of the same name in  one neighbourhood: Belsize Park, Belsize Street, Belsize  Road, Belsize Gardens, Belsize  Green,  Belsize  Circus,  Belsize  Yard,  Belsize Viaduct,  Belsize Arcade, Belsize Heath, etc.
     (b) Place a number  of streets  of exactly  the  same name in different districts. If  you have about twenty Princes Squares and  Warwick Avenues in the town, the muddle - you may claim without immodesty - will be complete.
     6.  Street names  should  be painted  clearly and  distinctly on  large boards. Then hide these boards carefully. Place them too high or too low, in shadow and darkness, upside down and inside out, or,  even better, lock them up in  a safe in your bank, otherwise they may  give  people some indication about the names of the streets.
   (...)
     P.S. - I have been told that my above-described theory is all wrong and is only due to my Central European conceit,  because the English do not care for  the  opinion  of  foreigners.  In every  other  country,  it  has  been explained, people  just  build streets and towns  following their own common sense. England is the only country of the world where there is a Ministry of Town and Country Planning. That is the real reason for the muddle. :D
« Последнее редактирование: 19 Мая 2010, 15:14:35 от LYNX » Записан

«... І у вi снах, навік застиглих у моїх очах » Віктуар
Лiнкс
Administrator
Архимаг
*****
Оффлайн Оффлайн

Пол: Женский
Сообщений: 84115


КОФЕ - ОН!


WWW E-mail
« Ответ #3 : 19 Мая 2010, 15:13:59 »

И перевод.  :)
Не самый лучший, но дающий представление о том, что написано в тексте выше:

Великобританию никак не назовешь «упадочной демократией». Это страна спартанского образа жизни, обусловленного, главным образом, британской техникой градостроительства, пренебрегающей обычными удобствами, которыми пользуются остальные народы мира, слабые и изнеженные.
Средневековые рыцари заковывали себя в латы не только для защиты, но и для поддержания боевого духа; монахи тех времен умерщвляли плоть власяницей; индийским йогам сохранить хорошую форму помогает обычай вздремнуть часок-другой на коврике с гвоздями. Возможность терпеть все эти муки, не прибегая к помощи лат, власяницы и гвоздей, дают английские методы градостроительства.
В других странах больницы, адвокатские конторы, книжные магазины и тому подобные заведения разбросаны по всему городу, и в любом районе можно найти, например, хорошего или, во всяком случае, дорогого врача. В Англии считается, что специалиста делает адрес. Так, лондонские врачи скучены на Харли-Стрит, адвокаты на Линкольнз-Инн-Филдз, букинистические лавки на Чаринг-Кросс-Роуд, газетчики на Флит-Стрит, портные на Савил-Роу, торговцы автомобилями на Грейт-Портланд-Стрит, театры в Пиккадилли-Серкус, кинотеатры на Лестер-Сквер и т.д.
Теперь несколько практических советов по градостроительству в Англии.
Английский город следует рассматривать как широко разветвленный заговор, цель которого -- запутать иностранцев. Необходимо прибегнуть к столетиями выработанным приемам и хитростям.
1. Прежде всего -- никаких прямых улиц. Англичане любят уединение, поэтому, стоя в начале улицы, человек не должен видеть ее конца. Стройте улицу с неожиданными поворотами, например, буквой S. Все большее применение находят также литеры L, T, V, Y, W и О. Вы отдали бы дань уважения грекам, построив несколько улиц с конфигурацией буквы П или Н; сделали бы приятное русским, оказав внимание букве Я; а китайцы были бы более чем польщены, обнаружив проезд в форме сложного иероглифа.
2. Дома на одной улице ни в коем случае не следует ставить по прямой линии. Британия всегда славилась свободолюбием, а свобода строить лабиринты -- одно из их древнейших гражданских прав.
3. Еще больше заморочить иностранцев позволяет нумерация домов. У примитивных иноземных народов четные номера домов находятся на одной стороне улицы, нечетные -- на другой, и вы твердо знаете, что они убывают с юга на север или с востока на запад. В Англии тоже принята эта система, но нумерация может, начавшись как положено и дойдя до какого-либо номера по одной стороне, перекинуться на другую и продолжаться в обратном направлении.
Если вы суеверны, отдельные номера можно пропустить; можно ответвить нумерацию на какой-нибудь переулок; можно присвоить один и тот же номер сразу двум-трем домам.
Но это далеко не все. Многие вообще отказываются от нумерации, предпочитая имена собственные. Так, оказавшись на улице, состоящей из трехсот пятидесяти бунгало-близнецов, очень приятно заняться поисками дома с названием «Бунгало». Или попасть на улицу, где из окон всех домов открывается очаровательный вид на холмы, и попытаться найти «Вид на холмы». Или проискав «Семь дубов», обнаружить нужный дом у трех яблонь.
4. При малейшем изгибе улицы, дайте ее продолжению другое название; но если поворот столь крут, что в самом деле получаются две разные улицы, можно именовать их одинаково. С другой стороны, если по недосмотру улица проведена прямо, то она должна иметь много разных названий (Хай-Холборн, Нью-Оксфорд-Стрит, Оксфорд-Стрит, Бейсуотер-Роуд, Ноттинг-Хилл-Гейт, Холланд-Парк, и так далее).
5. Поскольку отдельные смекалистые иностранцы способны сориентироваться даже в таких условиях, необходимо принять дальнейшие меры. Называйте улицы по-разному: стрит, роуд, плейс, мьюз, кресент, авеню, райз, лейн, уэй, гроув, парк, гарденз, аллей, арч, пат, уок, бродвей, променад, гейт, террас, вейл, вью, хилл, и т.д. (т.е. улица, дорога, площадь, двор, объезд, проспект, спуск, переулок, путь, роща, парк, сад, аллея, арка, проезд, дорожка, магистраль, тропа, ворота, терраса, долина, панорама, холм и т.д.). (*)
* Когда эта книга была сдана в печать, в газете "Таймс" появилась заметка о том, что у английского слова street чуть ли не шестьдесят синонимов. Добавьте к ним названия, в которых отсутствует само слово «улица» (Пиккадилли, Стрэнд, и т.д.), а также широко распространенные двойные наименования (Гарден-Террас, Черч-Стрит, Парк-Роуд -- Садовая терраса, Церковная улица, Парковая дорога и т.д.), и количество обозначений понятия «улица» дойдет до сотни, а то и перевалит за нее. В одном из писем в газету высказывалось мнение, что это наглядно показывает, как у англичан развито воображение. На мой взгляд, это показывает как раз обратное. Одна из улиц лондонского Уэст-Энда называется «Хеймаркет» («Сенной рынок») не потому, что игривая фантазия лондонцев населила этот район средневековыми торговцами снедью, облаченными в романтические одежды, но всего лишь потому, что они до сих пор не заметили, что торговля сеном в районе от Пиккадилли до Пэлл-Мэлла за последние триста лет серьезно пошла на спад. (Прим. автора).
Кроме того, существует еще два приема:
а) Запихать все одноименные улицы и площади в какой-нибудь один район: Белсайз-Парк, Белсайз-Стрит, Белсайз-Роуд, Белсайз-Гарденз, Белсайз-Грин, Белсайз-Серкус, Белсайз-Ярд, Белсайз-Вайэдакт, Белсайз-Аркейд, Белсайз-Хит, и т.д.
б) Назвать несколько улиц в разных районах совершенно одинаково. Если в вашем городе наберется штук двадцать Принсез-Сквер и Уорвик-Авеню, вы можете смело считать, что лабиринт построен.
6. Названия улиц нужно четко и разборчиво писать на больших табличках. Затем эти таблички следует тщательно спрятать. Повесьте табличку как можно выше или ниже, в тени, за деревьями, вверх ногами и надписью к стене, а лучше -- заприте ее в сейфе своего банка, иначе она может подсказать прохожему название улицы.

P.S. Однажды мне сказали, что моя теория, описанная выше, насквозь ошибочна и объясняется только моим центральноевропейским самомнением, так как англичанам нет никакого дела до иностранцев. Во всех других странах, объяснили мне, города и улицы строят, руководствуясь здравым смыслом. Англия -- единственная страна мира, в которой есть Министерство градостроительства. Именно благодаря этому обстоятельству и строятся лабиринты.
« Последнее редактирование: 19 Мая 2010, 15:17:48 от LYNX » Записан

«... І у вi снах, навік застиглих у моїх очах » Віктуар
lantan
Библиоман
*******
Оффлайн Оффлайн

Сообщений: 2410


редкозем с глазами цвета хмурого неба


WWW E-mail
« Ответ #4 : 19 Мая 2010, 15:46:32 »

Thank you  :thank:. Now that one stereotype has been dismissed, here comes another.
The same author, the same fun :):

HOW TO PLAN A TOWN

   


True.
Most certainly and undoubtedly. :lol:

Nothing could be easier than getting lost in London.
If you want to find your way around, what do you do? You get a map.
Then, when you look at the map and try to decipher all those squiggles and bends on a page and, of course, eventually get lost, you try to ask a kind passer-by about the location of your desired place. But! Here comes the twist - when you pronounce the name of the place, you most often get a blank look from this kind passer-by, and a question - "Excuse me?". For the written name usually appears nearly the opposite of how it is pronounced (Hello, English!), with all those omitted Rs and Hs and all that lot.
Eventually, when you sort out names and directions and find yourself nearly there you will only see that the desired building disappeared form the face of the Earth alltogether. For it is either hidden around tha-a-a-at little corner further down the road or it is on the other side of the street, or it is concealed  in a court-yard, not seen from the street at all.
So, it takes a great skill and a good deal of patience, but mostly luck to find your way around London, but look on a bright side - when you eventually find what you've been searching for, after those struggles you're highly unlikely to forget it again! :lol:
Записан

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I can not change, courage - to change the things I can, and wisdom - to see the difference.
Страниц: [1] Вверх Печать 
Форум Альдебаран  |  Литература  |  Специальная литература и Обучение  |  Наша Academia (Модератор: Лiнкс)  |  Тема: Ask those who know... « предыдущая тема следующая тема »
Перейти в:  

Powered by SMF 2.0.9 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC